Messukeskus

“There is a notion deep-rooted in our corporate culture that every piece of feedback, criticism in particular, is a possibility for improvement.”

When smiley faces are not enough

Messukeskus is Finland’s largest venue, and hundreds of events and meetings are held there every year. With visitor numbers hovering around a million, customer experience measurement plays a very important but challenging role. At Messukeskus, quality control manager Anita Mäkelä is in charge of listening to the customer’s voice. She takes care of measuring customer experience and especially relaying the feedback to the right people.
Messukeskus has been conducting customer satisfaction surveys for decades, but systematic customer experience measurement efforts were initiated three years ago, when the organisation started using Roidu feedback devices in the summer of 2016. The entire feedback system was updated, and now feedback is collected in various ways: the facility features feedback devices, visitor surveys are conducted during events, and email and text message surveys are directed at event organisers, exhibitors and those that have contacted customer service. There is also a feedback channel on the company’s website.

Messukeskus uses Roidu feedback devices specifically to collect spontaneous feedback. Besides measuring general customer satisfaction, their specific purpose is to collect open feedback.

“Smiley faces alone are not enough, since we want more precise feedback in support of service development. By measuring customer satisfaction, we are discovering trends and finding out if we are headed in the right direction. However, feedback and improvement ideas tell us where that direction is,” Mäkelä describes.

Aggregate reports improve understanding on every level of a large organisation

The feedback received is truly significant in the day-to-day activities of Messukeskus. The company’s quality criteria state that all customer feedback is to be answered within a day and this promise is kept even during the busiest times. “There is a notion deep-rooted in our corporate culture that every piece of feedback, criticism in particular, is a possibility for improvement,” says Mäkelä in summary. Feedback is processed monthly in sales and steering groups. The root causes of critique are examined and appropriately reacted to when needed.
Every Monday, last week’s feedback is compiled into an aggregate report for the whole organisation, which is the most read news item in internal communications. Sharing the customer feedback for the whole organisation to read is important in Mäkelä’s opinion:

“Aggregate reports improve understanding on every level of a large organisation, in addition to transparency and mutual understanding of what is important to us.”

People at Messukeskus are particularly satisfied with Roidu’s comprehensive service. Feedback devices are delivered ready for use, and their operation is ensured on continuous basis. When problems occur, they are dealt with quickly and flexibly. “I especially appreciate the fact that the service is made so easy to the customer,” Mäkelä describes.